Fiber Rich Foods List

List of Fiber Rich Foods

Dietary fiber found in vegetables and fruits serve the body in several ways. The American Dietetic Association stated that fiber allows food to circulate efficiently through the body. Aside from that, fiber also aids in maintaining healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and vital factors for preventing diabetes, obesity and heart diseases. Fiber also helps support healthy digestion and reduces symptoms of digestive irregularities such as constipation. Due to the fact that fiber promotes satiation, regular intake of fiber rich foods can help manage one’s appetite thus, allowing healthy weight loss. 

Types of Fiber

There are basically two types of fiber: the soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is present in fruits such as bananas, oranges, kiwi, apples and vegetables; as well as in vegetables like carrots, spinach, artichokes and broccoli. It binds with the body’s fatty acids and prolongs emptying time of the stomach in order for the sugar to be released and absorbed at a slow and steady pace. The insoluble fiber on the other hand, is found in green leafy vegetables and in majority of fruits. This fiber type promotes digestive irregularity while aiding in the removal of wastes in the digestive colon.

Fiber Rich Foods List

The consumption of vegetables and fruits that are highly rich in fiber are recommended for sustained health as well as the prevention of common diseases and illnesses. Here is a fiber rich food list:

Fiber Rich Food Quantity Fiber (grams)
Apples (raw, including  skin) 1 medium 3.3
Apricots, dried 10 halves 2.6
Asparagus 4 spears 1.2
Avocado 1 ounce 1.9
Bagel – Cinnamon and Raisin 90g 2.0
Banana Each 3.1
Barley – pearl 200g 31.2
Beans – Baked 1 cup 10.4
Beans – Kidney 1 cup 16.4
Beans – Lima 1 cup 10.8
Beans – Navy 1 cup 19.1
Beans – Pinto 1 cup 15.4
Beets – cooked 1 cup 3.4
Beet – greens 1 cup 4.2
Blackberry 1 cup 7.6
Blueberry 1 cup 3.5
Breadcrumbs 1 cup 5.9
Bread – mixed grain 1 slice 1.6
Bread – Rye 1 slice 1.9
Broccoli 1 spear 1.2
Bulgur -dry 1 cup 25.6
Cabbage 1 cup 1.6
Carrot 1 (72g) 2.0
Cauliflower 1 cup 4.9
Cashews 1 ounce 1
Celery 1 cup 1.9
Cereal -Bran 1 cup 19.94
Cherries 15 2.1
Chickpeas 1 cup 10.6
Collards 1 cup 5.3
Corn – Sweet/yellow 1 cup 4.2
Cornmeal 1 cup 10.2
Cowpeas 1 cup 10.9
Dates – Deglat noor 5 (42g) 3.3
Fig – dried 2 (38g) 3.7
Grapefruit – pink 1 (246g) 4.0
Kiwi fruit 1 (76g) 2.3
Lentils 1 cup 15.6
Mango 1 (207g) 3.7
Mushrooms – Shitake 1 cup 3.4
Mustard Greens 1 cup 2.8
Noodles – egg 1 cup 1.8
Noodles – egg / spinach 1 cup 3.7
Nuts – Almonds 1 oz 3.3
Nuts – Brazil 1 oz 2.1
Nuts – Cashew 1 oz 0.9
Nuts – Chestnut / roasted 1 oz 7.3
Nuts – coconut (meat) 1 cup 4.2
Nuts – Hazelnut 1 oz 2.7
Nuts – Macademia 1 oz 2.3
Nuts – Pine 1 oz 1.0
Nuts – Pistachio 1 oz 2.9
Nuts – Walnut 1 oz 1.0
Oat bran – raw 1 cup 14.5
Okra 1 cup 4.0
Onions 1 (110g) 2.2
Orange 1 (130g) 3.1
Papaya 1 (305g) 5.5
Parsnip 1 cup 5.6
Peach 1 (98g) 1.5
Peanut 1 ounce 2.3
Pear 1 (165g) 5.1
Peas -Split 1 cup 16.3
Pineapple 1 cup 2.0
Plantain 1 (179g) 3.5
Potato – baked 1 (200g) 4.4
Pumpkin – canned 1 cup 7.1
Raisins 1 cup 5.4
Raspberry 1 cup 8.0
Rice – long grain /brown 1 cup 3.5
Rice – long grain /white 1 cup 3.1
Rutabagas 1 cup 3.1
Soybean 1 cup 10.3
Spaghetti – wholewheat 1 cup 6.3
Spinach – raw 30g 0.7
Squash – Summer / cooked 1 cup 2.5
Squash – Winter / cooked 1 cup 5.7
Strawberry 1 cup 3.3
Sweet potato (baked with skin) 1 cup 4.8
Tangerine 1 (84g) 1.5
Waterchestnuts – chinese 1 cup 3.5
Wheat flour – white 1 cup 3.4
Wheat flour – whole grain 1 cup 14.6

 References and further reading

USDA National Nutrient Database; University of Maryland Medical Center; Harvard School of Public Health.

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